Auguste Rodin: Danaid

The Danaids in Greek mythology were the fifty daughters of Danaus, king of Libya and twin brother of Egypt. The latter also had fifty children, boys however, and therefore his intent was to marry them with their cousins ​​so as to unite the kingdoms. However, the Danaids refusing to marry their cousins ​​fled with their father but the young men chased them forcing them to marry. Danaus gave each one the order to kill her husband on their wedding night. All obeyed except Hypermestra who married Linceo. The myth tells that the latter avenged the death of his brothers who ended up brutally and with deception, killing the Danaids while sparing his wife Hypermestra.

Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) in this sculpture of 1889 in interpreting the myth of her represents the pain of the prostrate Danaid almost immersed in the rock where she atones for the guilt of killing her husband on the orders of her father. In the work, Rodin uses his great expressive ability in the shaping of the material. The curve of the back, so defined in every detail, is a poetic reference to sensuality and love. The crouching girl seems to be about to sink or perhaps emerge from the earth. Her hair fades towards the raw material of marble without interruption in an “unfinished” of Michelangelo's derivation.

The reproduction of the famous statue of the French sculptor is produced in Italy by master craftsmen of marble and alabaster.

You can find it in different sizes on our shop:

www.gingershoponline.com

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